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Drabble #1: “First Flight”

Alex Roddie
Alex Roddie

A Drabble is defined as a work of fiction less than 100 words in length. Here is my first attempt:

First Flight

What if I let go?

Below, the wall echoes and grasps at my weakening body. Gravity is undeniable. I begin to realise that my attempt to cheat it will end in failure.

My arms scream. Calves shake from the effort of standing on an edge the width of a pencil. The rope curves down, singing in space with the wind, forty metres to the ledge where John freezes, scared, hopeful still.

But I can’t climb this pitch. Calm washes over me. There is a perfect freedom in what I am about to do.

I close my eyes and jump.

NotesDrabbleWriting

Alex Roddie

Happiest on a mountain. Writer, story-wrangler, digital and film photographer. Editor of Sidetracked magazine (I make the words come out good).

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