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What does a book editor do?

Alex Roddie
Alex Roddie
1 min read

There’s often a critical difference between knowing what you want to communicate and actually communicating it effectively

The work of an editor can sometimes be opaque. Writers send us their books to edit, and a few weeks later they receive their manuscript back – plus a few thousand tracked changes – but what goes on in the middle can be a bit of a mystery.

Cathy O’Dowd invited me to chat about what an adventure editor actually does. In my interview over at The Business of Adventure, we talk about the editorial process, why writers can’t effectively edit their own work, my opinions on self-publishing, and how I’ve been able to help two of my clients.

What do you think of the growing trend towards self-publishing by adventurers?
I think it’s almost entirely positive. Self-publishing is a remarkable thing that gives a voice to writers who might otherwise not have been given a chance in traditional publishing. There is an audience out there for your story, and it’s up to you to find it – that’s incredibly empowering.
There are downsides to self-publishing, of course. It’s tempting to publish the instant you have the words down on the page, but you’re wasting your chance if you don’t invest the time and money into doing it properly.

Read the full interview here.

P.S. If you’re into outdoor writing, I recommend the Business of Adventure newsletter. You can sign up here.

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Alex Roddie

Happiest on a mountain. Writer, story-wrangler, digital and film photographer. Editor of Sidetracked magazine (I make the words come out good).

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