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Pinnacle Editorial COVID-19 status update

Alex Roddie
Alex Roddie
2 min read
Pinnacle Editorial COVID-19 status update

Here’s how the global pandemic is affecting my business. I never expected to write those words, but here we are!

Right now, as the world struggles to adapt to new and terrifying circumstances, and the economy shudders to a halt, creative industries are coming to terms with what this means for us. Publishers and authors have been faced with the prospect of cancelled book tours and thousands of unsold books. Travel writers are unable to travel. Newsstand sales of magazines will be crashing through the floor. It’s a mess, and the mess is going to get messier.

I’d like to reassure my clients that it’s very much business as usual for Pinnacle Editorial – for now, at least. If I’ve agreed to do some work for you, it’ll be done on time and to the best of my abilities. Should that be forced to change by circumstances beyond my control, I will be communicating with clients individually.

As most of you know, my operation is a small one. I have worked from home for years now. If I’m well enough to stand at my standing desk, I’ll be analysing story structures, honing and tightening prose, and working on my own books. Self-isolating would be no great hardship for me, if it comes to that, because I’m used to working in monastic seclusion for days or weeks at a time anyway. In fact, I thrive on it – it helps me to create my best work. I’d sorely miss my morning walks, though.

Right now, I have as much work as I can handle for several months. That might change if clients cancel jobs, so I may be announcing unexpected availability at some point in the next few months. Watch this space.


I’m well aware how fortunate I am to be suffering such a low level of disruption at this difficult time. I know many other freelance writers and editors who are facing cancelled bookings and cashflow black holes, so I sympathise. On a personal level, things aren’t without anxiety here; my wife’s a professional florist, and she has no idea if she’ll still be allowed to trade this time next month. My mum is elderly and has those ‘underlying health conditions’ we’ve been hearing about so much in the media lately. I worry, too, about the impact this virus will have on my home village with its elderly population.

I hope that my valued clients, colleagues and readers stay safe, and once all this is over maybe I’ll see you on the hill.

EditorialNotes

Alex Roddie

Happiest on a mountain. Writer, story-wrangler, digital and film photographer. Editor of Sidetracked magazine (I make the words come out good).

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