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Drabble #2: “Second Flight”

Alex Roddie
Alex Roddie

More 100 word fiction with a climbing theme (sequel to “First Flight“)

Second Flight
by Alex Roddie

Something moves in the abyss.

Rocks fall, echoing from one vertical plane to the next. A raven takes wing from his perch and floats on the updraught, head darting side to side, eyes capturing the movement far beneath. Flecks of snow drift down on the crystal air.

Looking down from the ledge, unfathomable depths are mine alone. John is long gone, set loose by my flight from the upper flake crack. I coil the rope and wait.

A harsh sound disturbs my calm: helicopter. It comes for me but I don’t want it. This peace is mine alone.

NotesDrabble

Alex Roddie

Happiest on a mountain. Writer, story-wrangler, digital and film photographer. Editor of Sidetracked magazine (I make the words come out good).

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