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Scotland

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Photography on the Trail

You don’t need a ton of gear to create meaningful images on a long-distance trail. Sometimes an agile approach can be best. This feature was first published in On Landscape (Issue 132), February 2017. All images © Alex Roddie. By its very nature, landscape photography requires the photographer to be

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The Alder Trail – Field Notes

Alder Trail, Scotland, backpacking

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A moment in time: November 30th, 2009

‘I can’t do it, Roddie. I’m going back down. Sorry, mate.’ It was one of those most perfect of winter mornings. The season had started early in Glen Coe, with snow sweeping the mountains before a cold snap froze everything up, bright and gleaming. In the bar the

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Book review: Moonwalker by Alan Rowan

Moonwalker: Adventures of a midnight mountaineerby Alan Rowan Walking the Munros. This is a time-honoured subject for hillwalking books, and it might be thought that nothing new can be contributed to the topic. Search for books on the Munros and you’ll find everything from detailed guides to memoirs. However,

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The Caplich Wind Farm proposal threatens the wild land of Scotland

Update: UKHillwalking asked me to adapt this article as an opinion piece for their website. You can read the extended version here. Although I lived in Scotland for a number of years, I can’t claim an intimate acquaintance with the far North West of the country — that wild and

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Forty-eight hours at the Lairig Leacach bothy — a typecast

In a departure from my usual form for trip reports, I’m writing this one up as a typecast — that is, scans of pages typed on a manual typewriter. I used an analogue camera to take all the photos on this trip so it feels appropriate. I hope you enjoy

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Scotland’s last glacier … as it appears in the present day!

Photo (C) James Roddie 2014, all rights reserved Back in January, it emerged that the last glacier in the Scottish highlands may have lasted well into the 1700s. Coire an Lochain, a deeply carved corrie in the northern Cairngorms, was believed to be the site of one of the last

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Winter climbing conditions – how much information is too much?

British winter climbing is in a strange place at the moment. We like to get away to the hills as an escape from “real life,” and yet the world of climbing frequently mirrors the world around us even if we like to pretend that it doesn’t. Look around you.

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The Mounth Passes by Neil Ramsay and Nate Pedersen: book review

The Mounth Passes: A Heritage Guide to the Old Ways through the Grampian Mountains by Neil Ramsay and Nate Pedersen (Kindle) This slim ebook came to my attention through the Scotways Twitter account. Scotways is one of the oldest outdoor access organisations in the country, established in 1845 to help

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Scotland’s last surviving glacier lasted into the 1700s, research shows

My new novel, The Atholl Expedition, asks a question: when did the last glacier in Scotland die? Was it thousands of years ago in the prehistoric past, as is commonly believed, or did a glacial mass survive in one of the remote and secret recesses of the Highlands, away from

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